AccueilPortailCalendrierFAQRechercherS'enregistrerConnexion

Partagez | .
 

 [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Yao

avatar

Masculin
Age : 28
Messages : 2842
Localisation : Paris
Inscription : 04/07/2007

MessageSujet: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Lun 6 Aoû 2007 - 22:55

Article en VO (résumé en Français plus tard) :

Citation :
When I first read Disneyland Paris - From Sketch from Reality, I was especially fascinated by four pages in the book. Two are about the original Space Mountain concepts (I will explore those in a later article). Two are about the hotel concepts that were never built. One of those is an aircraft carrier, the other is completely transparent! Now here was something I had never heard about before buying the book. I had to explore this creative aspect of the Disneyland Paris story. I needed to learn all I could about "the hotels that never were". Let me take you with me today to discover the results of that quest.

As you know already if you read Michael Eisner's Work in Progress, early 1988, both Wing Chao and Eisner decided to gather some of the best architects at the time. To do so, they decide to "hijack" a dinner organised by architectural critic Elizabeth McMillan. Through this astonishing procedure, they assembled at the Studio that evening around a Chinese food dinner a "think tank" that includes among others Frank Gehry, Stanley Tingerman, Michael Rotondi and Robert Stern, along with some world famous art critics and architectural journalists. That first "impromptu" work-session was soon followed by a second one, on Easter weekend of 1988. The team that gathered then was nicknamed the "gang of 5": Robert Stern, Frank Gehry, Stanley Tingerman, Michael Graves and Robert Venturi.

The meeting was headed by Wing Chao, who at the time directed a structure of Disney separate from Walt Disney Imagineering and known as the Disney Development Company (DDC). It is during that second "workshop" that Robert Venturi introduced an idea that is mentioned in the book "The Architecture of Reassurance": creating a giant avenue, between the Park and the hotels, lined with 160-foot tall Mickey and Minnie figures.

Now it is interesting to note that in parallel to that creative work headed by the DDC, Walt Disney Imagineering was also working on ideas for the area of the hotels. One of those WDI work sessions happened in Palm Springs and was directed by guest architect Charles Moore (1925 - 1993), famous among other projects for the Hood Museum of Art in Hanover, NH and the Burns House in Santa Monica Canyon, CA and who had taught at Berkeley, Yale and UCLA. Among the ideas suggested for the hotels: a cruise ship surrounded by a sea of grass, a hotel in the shape of a castle, one that evoked Hollywood with an Old West town and even the idealistic town of Shangri-La. WDI also imagined the heart of the resort taking the form of an island surrounded by an area of canals, rivers and lakes with water playing an important role in making guests reassured and comfortable.

But it is DDC that in the end was named as the leader of the hotel side of the Disneyland Paris project and on Easter Weekend it had settled the master-planning thanks to the help of the "Gang of Five". It could move to phase two : the competition between the best and most renown architects of the world. And that's where things became really interesting: when those world-class architects explained their ideas to the top Disney management team during a 4 days session, only three weeks later.
The central theme for all the hotels was to be America.

Austrian Hans Hollein admitted that, for him, America meant "war". Thus, he conceived of a hotel in the form of an aircraft carrier. Dutchman Rem Koolhass came up with a concept for a hotel on a pedestal with a shape like a Goodyear blimp. The French Jean Nouvel proposed a completely transparent hotel. Now you would think that this was by far the most outrageous of all the ideas introduced during that meeting. You would be wrong!

American Peter Eisenman suggested a hotel that would be entirely underground for the area where the Sequoia Lodge is located today. His theory was that the French countryside was so beautiful that it should be protected. He also felt that the unifying theme for Disney is death, which one finds at the center of most of the great classic Disney animated films!
Some of the concepts that also died were Christian de Pozamparc's proposal inspired by the Colorado mountains, Jean-Paul Vigier's and Stanley Tingerman's idea centered around the theme of western films and Swiss architect Bernard Tschumi's very modern concept: circular, red, and in the middle of which sat a marina.

Two projects that excited the DDC team also did not make it to the final stage, but for more subtle reasons.

First was Italian architect's Aldo Rossi's suggestion of a New Orleans themed hotel. While excellent from a design point of view, it required some functional adaptations. Aldo Rossi refused to include those. His magnificent rebuttal is quoted by Michael Eisner in Work in Progress: "Dear Michael, I am not personally offended and can ignore all the negative points that have been made about our projects in Paris, [...] The Cavalier Bernini, invited to Paris for the Louvre project was tormented by a multitude of functionaries who continued to demand that changes be made to the project to make it more functional. It is clear that I am not the Cavalier Bernini, but it is also clear that you are not the King of France. Aside from the differences, I do not intend to be the object of minuscule criticisms that any interior designer could handle. It is my belief that our project, notwithstanding the specialists, is beautiful in its own right and as such will become famous and built in some other place."
The second issue was even more bitter and bruised even more egos. One of the hotels that had been selected for construction by DDC during the 4 days session was Robert Venturi's. Venturi had created a hotel called Hotel Fantasia that had Las Vegas as its central theme.

But while DDC, headed by Wing Chao, was busy selecting the best proposals for the hotels of Disneyland Paris, Tony Baxter's team at WDI was hard at work creating the park itself. And among the renderings that they showed to Michael Eisner at the time was a concept for the entrance of the park that included a fake facade of a big hotel. The facade was there to reassure, to give a sense of welcoming to arriving guests. However, building a fake facade was way too costly. The project only made sense if conceived as a real hotel (what would become the Disneyland Hotel). But there was no budget or economic rational for that new hotel. So it came down to a "simple" choice: either the Disneyland Hotel would go or the Hotel Fantasia concept would be scraped.
To define the matter, Michael Eisner decided to bring Tony Baxter and Robert Venturi together in one room in order to hear their respective arguments. Robert Venturi thought a hotel shouldn't be located at the entrance to the Park, so that you could see 'Le Château de la Belle au Bois Dormant' from the freeway. For Tony Baxter, the Disneyland experience shouldn't begin until you had entered the Park. The view of the castle was at the heart of the debate. As we all know, in the end Eisner sided with Tony's views. And we are obviously glad that he did.
Now, however, there was still at least one part of Tony's original project that did not exactly make it to the final phase. You are all familiar with the "Fantasia Gardens" located in front of the Disneyland Hotel, at the entrance of the park. Originally, the "Fantasia Gardens" were to have been called the "Electrical Light Gardens". An ice skating rink, evoking the "Nutcracker" sequence in Fantasia, would have been located in the middle of the gardens. And they would have been decorated with small twinkling lights, which, during wintertime, would have come to life at night in a spectacular way. When the Imagineers decided to include the Electrical Parade in the Park, the project was abandoned.

Now the fun thing is that the Fantasia Gardens do bring us back to an earlier anecdote. When creating them, Tony Baxter was thinking of the welcoming aspects of Versailles gardens. So Aldo Rossi may not have been so far off when writing his letter to Eisner. There was a feel of Louis XIV in the air!

Before I conclude this piece, here are a few more details you may not have noticed. Did you know that:


Frank Armitage painted a fresco in the lobby of the Disneyland Hotel that depicts the inauguration of the hotel just as it might have taken place one hundred years ago in 1895. Frank is the person in the foreground with the white hair, sitting on a bench.

In the Hotel Santa Fe, the red building is the symbolic representation of a brothel.

Before creating the Sequoia Lodge hotel, French Antoine Grumbach had also worked on two different projects for Disneyland Paris: The first one, a landscaping idea was a park built in a Gaudi style with fountains, illuminated elements, and a play on the connections to water. The other one was a hotel, called "Forest of the Giants", the rooms of which would have been located in giant sequoia trees.

From Jean de Lutece


Dernière édition par le Dim 13 Jan 2008 - 0:46, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Lediune

avatar

Masculin
Age : 32
Messages : 148
Localisation : Espagne
Inscription : 04/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Jeu 9 Aoû 2007 - 17:30

Pour ma part, j'attendrai la version VF puisque tu le proposes si gentiment :)

Merci en tout cas d'avoir posté la version en VO.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Brico

avatar

Messages : 58
Inscription : 07/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Jeu 9 Aoû 2007 - 22:41

J'aurais bien aimé voir l'hotel transparent de Jean JOUR ! Mais de là a y dormir ?! affraid
Encore un truc pour l'homme invisible !lol!

Il n'y avait pas de dessins, croquis ou autres pour illustrer le texte ? L'hotel New Orlean aurait "collé" avec un post du précédent forum -et l'hotel sous-terrain pourrait -toujours-être construit au dessous du sequoia , non ? lol!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Delight

avatar

Masculin
Messages : 1032
Inscription : 06/08/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Ven 10 Aoû 2007 - 21:51

Juste pour répondre à Brico, il y a des photos de maquettes de certains
de ces Hotels Disney, en fin du livre "Disneyland Paris: de l'esquisse
à la création".
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
J. Thaddeus TOAD
Modérateur
avatar

Masculin
Age : 42
Messages : 4002
Localisation : Orléans
Inscription : 04/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Jeu 16 Aoû 2007 - 10:58

J'espère vraiment qu'un hôtel sur le thème de la Nouvelle Orléans verra le jour à DLRP... j'adore le Port Orleans de WDW! La place est prévue pour d'autres hôtels Disney, notamment près du Newport Bay Club/en face du site réservé pour Lava Lagoon!!Very Happy

Je me permet de reposter ici le petit plan que j'ai (vite) fait:
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Yao

avatar

Masculin
Age : 28
Messages : 2842
Localisation : Paris
Inscription : 04/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Dim 27 Jan 2008 - 17:05

Et voici une traduction approximative par mes soins (désolé du retard) :

Citation :

La première fois que j’avais lu Disneyland Paris, de l’esquisse à la création, j’avais été particulièrement fasciné par quatre pages du livre : deux étaient sur le concept original de Space Mountain (sur lequel je reviendrai plus tard), deux sur des projets d’hôtels jamais construits. Parmi ces projets l’un était un hôtel en forme de porte-avion, l’autre était entièrement transparent ! C’était là des choses dont je n’avais jamais entendu parler avant d’acheter le livre. Je me devais alors d’explorer cet aspect créatif de Disneyland Paris. J’avais besoin de tout connaître au sujet des hôtels qui ne virent jamais le jour. Laissez moi aujourd’hui vous emmenez avec moi à la découverte des résultats de cette quête.

Comme vous devez déjà le savoir si vous avez lu le Work In Progress (travail en développement) de Michael Eisner, au début de l’année 1988, Wing Chao & Michael Eisner décidèrent tout deux de réunir les meilleurs architectes de l’époque. Pour cela, ils décidèrent de « détourner » un diner organisé par la critique en architecture Elizabeth McMillan. Par cette étonnante méthode, ils ont alors organisé aux Studios ce soir là, autour d’un repas chinois, une « boîte où penser » réunissant notamment Frank Gehry, Stanley Tingerman, Michael Rotondi et Robert Stern, ainsi que des critiques d’art et journalistes en architecture parmi les plus célèbres au monde. Cette première séance de travail impromptue a été rapidement suivie par une seconde lors du week-end de pâques 1988. L’équipe ainsi constituée fut surnommé « le gang des 5 » : Robert Stern, Frank Gehry, Stanley Tingerman, Michael Graves et Robert Venturi.

Les réunions étaient dirigées par Wing Chao qui dirigeait au même moment une structure de Disney séparée de Walt Disney Imagineering, la Disney Development Company (DDC). C’est au cours de la deuxième rencontre de travail que Robert Venturi proposa une idée mentionnée dans le livre : « l’architecture du réconfort ». Créer une grande avenue, entre les parcs & les hôtels, doublée avec des figures de Mickey & Minnie de près de 49 mètres de haut.

Mais il est intéressant de noter qu’en parallèle de ce travail créatif dirigé par la DDC, Walt Disney Imagineering (WDI) travaillait aussi de son côté sur des idées pour une zone hôtelière. Une de ces réunions de WDI se déroula à Palm Springs, sous la direction de l’architecte & invité Charles Moore (1925-1993), réputé pour ses projets comme le Hood Museum of Art de Hanovre, la Burns House au Santa Monica Canyon (Californie), et qui avait aussi enseigné à Berkeley, Yale & ULCA. Parmi les idées proposées pour des hôtels : un bateau de croisière entouré par une mer d’herbe verte, un hôtel sous la forme de château, un autre encore qui évoquerait Hollywood par une vielle ville du Far-West et la recréation même de la ville imaginaire de Shangri-La (issu du roman Lost Horizon de James Hilton, ndlr). WDI avait aussi imaginé que le cœur du complexe puisse prendre la forme d’un île entourée de canaux, rivières & lacs, l’eau devant jouer un rôle primordial dans la création d’un univers accueillant & réconfortant pour les visiteurs.

Au final DDC fut choisie pour prendre la tête du projet hôtelier de Disneyland Paris et au cours d’un week-end de pâque le master-plan fut défini grâce à l’aide du gang des 5. Nous pouvions donc passer à la phase 2 : la compétition entre les meilleurs & plus connus architectes du monde. C’est ici que les choses deviennent vraiment intéressantes : lorsque la crème mondiale de l’architecture expliqua aux pontes de Disney durant une session de 4 jours, seulement trois semaines plus tard, leurs idées. Un thème commun était imposé à tous : l’Amérique.

L’australien Hans Hollein admit que pour lui l’« Amérique » était synonyme de « Guerre ». Ainsi il conçut un hôtel en forme de porte-avion. L’allemand Rem Koolhass proposa un hôtel fait d’un socle et d’une forme similaire à un dirigeable Goodyear. Le français Jean Nouvel émit l’idée d’un hôtel entièrement transparent. Mais si vous pensez que cette dernière est l’idée la plus originale & la plus éloignée parmi celle proposée, vous vous trompez !

L’américain Peter Eisenman suggéra un hôtel totalement souterrain à la place actuelle du Séquoia Lodge, pensant que la campagne française était tellement belle qu’elle devait être protégée. Il estimait aussi que le vrai thème unificateur chez Disney était la mort qu’il retrouvait dans beaucoup de grands classiques de la firme ! D’autre projets furent écartés : celui de Christian de Pozamparc inspiré par les montagnes du Colorado, celui de Jean-Paul Vigier & Stanley Tingerman centré sur les westerns ou encore le projet très moderne du suisse Bernard Tschumi : un bâtiment circulaire & rouge qui accueillerait au milieu une marina !

Deux projets intéressèrent beaucoup la DDC mais furent finalement abandonné pour des raisons plus subtiles.

D’une part le projet de l’italien Aldo Rossi basé sur le thème de la Nouvelle-Orléans. Bien qu’excellent du point de vu design, il nécessitait quelques adaptations fonctionnelles refusées par l’architecte. Son magnifique refus a été cité par Eisner dans son Work in Progress: « Cher Michael, je ne me sens pas personnellement offensé et je ne peux ignorer tous les points négatifs évoqués pour notre projet à Paris. […] Le Bernin invité à Paris pour le projet du Louvre avait été assailli par les fonctionnaires qui lui demandaient constamment de faire des changements pour rendre son projet plus fonctionnel. Il est clair que je ne suis par Le Bernin, mais il est aussi clair que vous n’êtes pas le Roi de France ! A part les différences, je n’ai pas l’intention d’être l’objet de petites critiques que n’importe quel architecte d’intérieur pourrait manipuler. C'est ma conviction de penser que notre projet, en dépit des spécialistes, est beau dans son propre droit et deviendra à ce titre réputé et construit ailleurs. " Le second hôtel laisse un goût plus amer et se ramène encore plus à des questions d’ego. Un des hôtels choisis par la DDC pour être construit était celui de Robert Venturi, nommé le Fantasia, ayant pour thème central Las Vegas.

Pendant que la DDC, sous la houlette de Wing Chao, était occupé à sélectionner les meilleures propositions pour les hôtels de Disneyland Paris, l’équipe de Tony Baxter à WDI travaillait avec acharnement à la conception du parc lui-même. Et parmi les premiers concepts-arts, montrés à Eisner, représentant l’entré du parc, il se trouvait une fausse & géante façade d’hôtel. Cette façade avait pour but de rassurer les visiteurs, de les accueillir en douceur. Cependant une telle construction couterait bien trop chère ! Le projet ne pouvait prendre sens que si un véritable hôtel était bâti (d’où le Disneyland Hotel). Mais aucun budget ni réserve d’argent n’avait été prévu pour ce nouvel hôtel. Ainsi un choix devait être fait : soit le Disneyland Hotel, soit le Fantasia sauterait !

Afin de se décider Michael Eisner décida donc de réunir Tony Baxter & Robert Venturi dans un même pièce pour entendre les arguments respectifs de chacun. Robert Venturi expliqua qu’un hôtel ne devait surtout pas être localisé à l’entrée du parc afin que la château de la Belle aux bois dormant puisse être visible de l’autoroute. Pour Tony Baxter, l’expérience Disney ne devait commencer jusqu’à ce que vous soyez dans le parc. La vue sur le château était au centre du débat. Comme vous le savez tous, Michael Eisner rejoignit au final Tony Baxter et nous sommes tous bien évidement très heureux de ce choix.

Cependant il reste encore une partie du projet de Tony Baxter qui ne passa pas en phase finale. Vous êtes tous habitués aux Fantasia Gardens situés devant l’hôtel Disneyland, à l’entrée du parc. A l’origine ces jardins devaient s’appeler les Electrical Light Gardens. Une patinoire évoquant la séquence Casse-noisette du film Fantasia devait se trouver au centre des jardins qui auraient été décorés avec de petites lumières clignotantes prenant vie d’une manière originale la nuit. Quand les imagineers décidèrent d’inclure la parade électrique dans le parc, l’idée de ces jardins fut abandonnée.

La chose amusante au sujet des Fantasia Gardens c’est qu’ils nous ramènent à l’anecdote précédente. Lors de leur création, Tony Baxter avait en tête l’aspect accueillant des jardins de Versailles. Ainsi Aldo Rossi (cf anecdote ci-dessus) a peut être vu juste lorsqu’il a écrit sa lettre à Eisner : un air de Louis XIV dans les airs !

Avant de conclure cet article, voici encore quelque détails que vous n’avez peut être pas remarquée. Savez vous que :

Frank Armitage a peint une fresque dans le hall du Disneyland Hotel représentant l’inauguration de l’hôtel telle qu’elle se serait dérouler il y a de cela près d’un siècle, en 1895. Frank est la personne au chapeau blanc à l’arrière plan, assis sur un banc.

A l’hôtel Sante Fe, le bâtiment rouge est la représentation symbolique d’un lupanar.

Avant de créer le Séquoia Lodge, le français Antoine Grumbach avait aussi travaillé sur 2 projets pour Disneyland Paris : le premier, un paysage de parc construit dans un style Gaudi (architecte & designer catalan, ndlr) avec des fontaines, des éléments illuminés, un jeu sur la connexion entre les plans d’eau. Le second était un hôtel nommé « Forêt des Géants », les chambres devant se localiser dans des troncs de séquoias géants.


Dernière édition par Yao le Dim 2 Mar 2008 - 20:23, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Gun Club

avatar

Masculin
Age : 25
Messages : 2861
Localisation : 10min de Disney
Inscription : 18/09/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Mar 19 Fév 2008 - 12:40

@J. Thaddeus TOAD a écrit:
J'espère vraiment qu'un hôtel sur le thème de la Nouvelle Orléans verra le jour à DLRP... j'adore le Port Orleans de WDW! La place est prévue pour d'autres hôtels Disney, notamment près du Newport Bay Club/en face du site réservé pour Lava Lagoon!!Very Happy

Je me permet de reposter ici le petit plan que j'ai (vite) fait:

Je verai le 3eme parc plus grand... Neutral
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
the magical disney radio



Masculin
Messages : 509
Inscription : 04/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Mar 19 Fév 2008 - 12:59

The.Twilight.Zone' a écrit:
@J. Thaddeus TOAD a écrit:
J'espère vraiment qu'un hôtel sur le thème de la Nouvelle Orléans verra le jour à DLRP... j'adore le Port Orleans de WDW! La place est prévue pour d'autres hôtels Disney, notamment près du Newport Bay Club/en face du site réservé pour Lava Lagoon!!Very Happy

Je me permet de reposter ici le petit plan que j'ai (vite) fait:

Je verai le 3eme parc plus grand... Neutral

Pour ta gouverne, l'espace du 3eme parc correspond à 2x l'espace du Magic Kingdom, donc de quoi créer UN monstre gigantesque.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Chevreuil

avatar

Masculin
Messages : 477
Inscription : 27/10/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Dim 24 Fév 2008 - 12:35

wahou il y avait du beau monde ! moi j'adorerai un hotel tiki ! ce serai trop chouette
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
*Zazu*

avatar

Masculin
Age : 22
Messages : 549
Localisation : Binche
Inscription : 13/10/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Dim 24 Fév 2008 - 17:46

@J. Thaddeus TOAD a écrit:
J'espère vraiment qu'un hôtel sur le thème de la Nouvelle Orléans verra le jour à DLRP... j'adore le Port Orleans de WDW! La place est prévue pour d'autres hôtels Disney, notamment près du Newport Bay Club/en face du site réservé pour Lava Lagoon!!Very Happy

Je me permet de reposter ici le petit plan que j'ai (vite) fait:

le parking et un peu grand par a por au parc

désolé pour les fautes
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
the magical disney radio



Masculin
Messages : 509
Inscription : 04/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Dim 24 Fév 2008 - 19:53

benoit 1995 a écrit:
@J. Thaddeus TOAD a écrit:
J'espère vraiment qu'un hôtel sur le thème de la Nouvelle Orléans verra le jour à DLRP... j'adore le Port Orleans de WDW! La place est prévue pour d'autres hôtels Disney, notamment près du Newport Bay Club/en face du site réservé pour Lava Lagoon!!Very Happy

Je me permet de reposter ici le petit plan que j'ai (vite) fait:

le parking et un peu grand par a por au parc

désolé pour les fautes

Normal, il faut savoir que ce parc est, contrairement aux WDS et DLP totalement à l'opposé. Il est inenvisageable de créer des tapis roulants du parking central au 3eme parc ! Donc il est plus simple de créer un parking réservé à ce parc. Après, peut-être qu'il y aura des navettes entre ce parc et les hôtels ;les 2 autres parcs ou bien le Val d'Europa à la limite.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Max



Masculin
Messages : 641
Inscription : 25/12/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Dim 24 Fév 2008 - 21:25

@Yao a écrit:
Une de ces réunions de WDI se déroula à Palm Springs, sous la direction de l’architecte & invité Charles Moore (1925-1933), réputé pour ses projets comme le Hood Museum of Art de Hanovre, la Burns House au Santa Monica Canyon (Californie), et qui avait aussi enseigné à Berkeley, Yale & ULCA.

Vachement précoce le gars silent
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
J. Thaddeus TOAD
Modérateur
avatar

Masculin
Age : 42
Messages : 4002
Localisation : Orléans
Inscription : 04/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Dim 2 Mar 2008 - 18:23

@Max a écrit:
@Yao a écrit:
Une de ces réunions de WDI se déroula à Palm Springs, sous la direction de l’architecte & invité Charles Moore (1925-1933), réputé pour ses projets comme le Hood Museum of Art de Hanovre, la Burns House au Santa Monica Canyon (Californie), et qui avait aussi enseigné à Berkeley, Yale & ULCA.

Vachement précoce le gars silent
Sérieusement, Charles Moore: 1925-1993 Wink
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Yao

avatar

Masculin
Age : 28
Messages : 2842
Localisation : Paris
Inscription : 04/07/2007

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Lun 3 Mar 2008 - 0:25

@J. Thaddeus TOAD a écrit:
@Max a écrit:
@Yao a écrit:
Une de ces réunions de WDI se déroula à Palm Springs, sous la direction de l’architecte & invité Charles Moore (1925-1933), réputé pour ses projets comme le Hood Museum of Art de Hanovre, la Burns House au Santa Monica Canyon (Californie), et qui avait aussi enseigné à Berkeley, Yale & ULCA.

Vachement précoce le gars silent
Sérieusement, Charles Moore: 1925-1993 Wink

Smile En effet petite erreure de frappe . . . en fait c'était pour voir si vous suiviez voyons . . . comment ça c'est ce qu'on dit ? Voilà l'erreure corrigée, merci. Wink
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Dream Rider

avatar

Masculin
Age : 25
Messages : 934
Localisation : Paris
Inscription : 30/01/2008

MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Lun 3 Mar 2008 - 0:32

Magie Dlrp a écrit:
benoit 1995 a écrit:
@J. Thaddeus TOAD a écrit:
J'espère vraiment qu'un hôtel sur le thème de la Nouvelle Orléans verra le jour à DLRP... j'adore le Port Orleans de WDW! La place est prévue pour d'autres hôtels Disney, notamment près du Newport Bay Club/en face du site réservé pour Lava Lagoon!!Very Happy

Je me permet de reposter ici le petit plan que j'ai (vite) fait:

le parking et un peu grand par a por au parc

désolé pour les fautes

Normal, il faut savoir que ce parc est, contrairement aux WDS et DLP totalement à l'opposé. Il est inenvisageable de créer des tapis roulants du parking central au 3eme parc ! Donc il est plus simple de créer un parking réservé à ce parc. Après, peut-être qu'il y aura des navettes entre ce parc et les hôtels ;les 2 autres parcs ou bien le Val d'Europa à la limite.

Le 3me parc ce n'est absolument pas pour tout de suite non ? Sinon c'est encore plus proche des riverains, donc bon un "monstre" de parc faut voir...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: [Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92 Mar 4 Mar 2008 - 23:22

Je crois avoir lu quelque part que le prochain hôtel Disney qui était prévu serait un 4 étoiles et je pense dans la continuité du thème américain, avec la création d'un centre de convention.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
[Article] Les projets d'hôtels de Disneyland Paris en 92
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Disney Central Plaza :: Les parcs à thèmes Disney :: Imagineering-